The Creative Toolkit for Marketers

4 Common Problems with DIY’ing Your Video Assets

Dec 23, 2019 11:42:05 AM / by Bryan Johnston

Video production crew filming a stunt school of a woman on fire

 

It’s tempting to think you can make your own videos. It’s perfectly understandable. Video equipment is cheaper and more abundant than ever before, and it seems like with your smartphone and the seemingly endless supply of apps a veritable video production studio is all at your fingertips. And you would be right.

 

However, the question that you should be asking yourself is, can I make my own videos well? I would put it to you this way: I have an oven, I have pots and pans, I even have a cookbook. But who would you rather make your meal? Me, the amateur cook, or Gordon Ramsey, the multiple Michelin star winning chef? If you tasted my cooking the answer would be apparent. There’s something to be said for experience. Here are 4 reasons why it may not be in your best interest to DIY your videos.

 

1. A video is a reflection of your company

In every part of your business you want to make the best impression. To your clients and customers, perception is reality. Your video assets should be as professional and polished as every other facet of your business. In many cases your videos may be your company’s first exposure to the general public, and I don’t need to tell you the importance of first impressions.

 

2. Making your own video can cost you more in the end

This sounds counterintuitive. The whole idea of making the videos yourself is to save you money, right? But here’s where it can actually get expensive. The landscape is littered with companies that had their nephew who's in film class in college make their video, only to sit back and realize that the quality is not up to snuff, and they have to start over again with a professional production company. They just invested in man-hours, and possibly equipment, for a video that will never see the light of day.

 

However, the greater cost can come if you lose work because you chose to produce your own video with a lower production value. Put yourself in your customer’s shoes; a poor-quality video does not instill trust, and trust is paramount in the business world. No one ever regrets paying for quality.

 

3. Time is money

In any company time is one of the most valued commodities. The time you’re spending making your own videos is time you’re not spending building your brand, selling to customers, or improving your product. And producing a professional video takes time: days, weeks, sometimes months.

 

4. Producing a video is harder than it looks

It’s easy to think, “Well, I’m just making a simple interview video. You aim the camera at the person, mic them up and they start talking.” This is the main differentiator between professional and amateur work: the details. Those details are addressed in two ways: Knowing and Having.

 

Knowing how to prepare for shooting an interview—the questions to ask in advance to narrow down the focus of the video by thoroughly understanding the audience and objectives.

Knowing where best to shoot the interviews.

Knowing what the person on camera should wear.

Knowing how to put that person at ease and draw out the best responses.

Knowing what camera and lens to use and having it at your disposal.

Knowing how to light it well.

Knowing how to edit the story together to make it more compelling.

Knowing how to color the video in post-production to make it really pop and having an array of technology to accomplish that.

Having the personnel and assets to add design elements to take the video to a completely different level.

 

And this is just for a simple interview video. If it’s a story-based video then there’s scripting, casting, make up, location scouting, permits. A lot of I’s to dot and T’s to cross properly.

 

Key takeaways

You take tremendous pride in your business and want every aspect of it to reflect quality, professionalism and trust. Those virtues can and will be reflected in your videos. Those videos are an investment of your time and your money. Invest well and wisely and the results will justify themselves.

 

Remember my cooking analogy at the beginning? Think of it in these terms: You’ve invited your biggest client over for dinner in an effort to close a huge deal and make your business a ton of money. Which would make a better impression? Your grilled cheese sandwich or Gordon Ramsay’s roast duck with mango salsa? Thought so.

 

Looking to find the right creative partner for your next video project? Click the link below to get a free downloadable worksheet.

10 Questions to Ask a Video Production Company Worksheet

 

Tags: Video production, Film production, DIY Video

Bryan Johnston

Written by Bryan Johnston

Bryan Johnston is the Creative Director at VMG. He loves movies, sports, reading, and writing. In no particular order. His one wish is to see the Seattle Mariners win the World Series in his lifetime. He is not holding his breath.

Lists by Topic

see all